In Microsoft PowerPoint, shapes and text boxes give you great control over how you lay your information out.

In this video, I explain the difference between shapes and text boxes and when to use each in Microsoft PowerPoint. I also explain the functionality of using Selection Pane for layers in PowerPoint.

Transcription for: Shapes vs Text Boxes and using Selection Pane for layers in Microsoft PowerPoint
Hi, Lynette from Kits and Bits here.

In this video, we’re going to look at the difference between text boxes and shapes in PowerPoint.

I use PowerPoint for creating much more than presentations. I use it for creating flyers, memes, images and buttons for my website and more.

Shapes and text boxes give you great control over how you lay your information out.

Traditionally people will use both well at a shape to create a background and then they’ll add a text box over the top but in most cases this is overkill because they’re not actually doing anything special with it and if you’ve got lots of content you end up with lots of layers which makes it much harder to manage.

Here I’ve added a couple of shapes and I’m going to show you how we can use both of them and why you should use a shape over a text box.

On the left-hand side, I’ve got a shape and normally people would add a text box over the top but what you can do is [right click] and then select [edit text].

Then I can format that shape just as I would normally, so I can;

  • change the shape fill and
  • change the text size,
  • text color,
  • whether it’s bold and
  • even where it sits within the shape (aka horizontal alignment)

I can also change where it sits vertically (aka vertical alignment) and I can change the text direction.

The difference here is that, if I choose to change the shape it will format the text with it so if I go into [Format], [Edit Shape], [Change shape] it will move the text around.if I rotate the shape then it will move the text with the same rotation if I wanted to have my shape on an angle but I didn’t want the text to be

If I rotate the shape then it will move the text with the same rotation.

If I wanted to have my shape on an angle but I didn’t want the text to be at an angle that’s when I would use a text box.

Here I’ve got a separate shape, I’m going to rotate that slightly and then I’m going to add a text box using the [Insert] tab and then text box and then draw it over the top and then I’m going to add my text to the separate entity and format it the way I would like it and this way I can treat that text completely separately.

I can leave it horizontal, I can rotate it on a different angle etc.

The trouble is when you start doing lots of these you can end up with lots and lots of layers so the one that thing that you do want to do is go to your [Home] tab and [Arrange] (or you can also do it by a [Format] and [Selection Pane]).

Over on the right-hand side, that will give you everything that appears here and you can actually rename those. If I wanted to rename this one I can rename it “shape with text”.I can then add this one you can see how it selects the one that you’re clicking on.

I can then add this one you can see how it selects the one that you’re clicking on and rename it “Shape without text” and then the text box can be “text only”.

So that way if you’ve got lots and lots of layers that you can’t actually select individual ones because they’re on top of each other you can come into the selection pane and select them and all highlight which ones are selected on the selection panel.

If you like this tip you might like others that I share on my Youtube Channel so you can go there and subscribe or go to my website www.kitsandbits.com.au and sign up to my email newsletter

Okay, thanks. Seeya.

End of Transcription
N.B. This transcription has been edited for better readability, however, the general structure is the same as the video.

 

Have you had trouble with Text Boxes in PowerPoint?

If so, I’d love to hear from you.

Cheers,

Lynette embodies an intrinsic ability to save business owners money by delivering back the all-elusive “spare” time so they can use it to do what they love. She puts these principles into practice in her own business – Kits and Bits. Lynette is an avid genealogist and tango dancer.

Lynette Delane

Tech Translator, Kits and Bits

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